Does Gout Increase The Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor?

Cardiovascular Disease and Gout

heart disease

The prevalence of cardiovascular disease continues to rise and is among the leading cause of mortality in the world. Inflammatory conditions such as Rheumatoid Arthritis and Gout are often associated with a higher risk and earlier onset of this disease. Research links gout to an increased risk of several types of cardiovascular disease, including heart attack, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation, or an irregular heartbeat. Epidemiological, experimental, and clinical data show that patients with hyperuricemia SUA are at increased risk of cardiac, renal, and vascular damage and CV events. Continue reading “Does Gout Increase The Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor?”

Hyperuricemia as a potential plausible risk factor for periodontitis

Abstract

Author:  Zi-yun Chen,Lu-wen Ye,Li Zhao,Zhao-jia Liang,Ting Yu,Jie Gao

Publication:  Medical Hypotheses

Publisher: Elsevier

Date: April 2020

Elevated blood uric acid (UA) levels have been positively associated with the severity of periodontitis. It thus brings out a hypothesis that hyperuricemia, a pathological elevation of blood UA, might be a risk factor for periodontitis. Namely, periodontitis individuals with Hu might acquire more severe periodontal destruction compared to those without Hu. To support the hypothesis, four aspects of evidences are proposed.

Continue reading “Hyperuricemia as a potential plausible risk factor for periodontitis”

New evidence of increased risk of death with Febuxostat (Uloric)

According to the latest CARES trial, the Gout drug Febuxostat (Uloric) failed up against Allopurinol when it came down to a combined rate of fatal and nonfatal adverse events for those that suffer with both Gout and Cardiovascular disease.  In fact, there was a significant increased risk of death for those that took this drug for Gout while also suffering from heart disease.

The trial was mandated by the FDA and consisted of 6,190 patients, 84% of which were men.  Cardiovascular risk is naturally increased in patients with Gout.  The study was attempting to look at any difference in outcome for these patients taking Febuxostat, a nonpurine xanthine oxidase inhibitor, or those taking Allopurinol, a purine base analogue xanthine oxidase inhibitor.  The patients were followed for a median of 32 months, and a maximum of 85 months.  Without diving into all of the ratio statistics, the all-cause and cardiovascular mortality rate was higher in the Febuxostat group, 34% and 22% higher respectively. Continue reading “New evidence of increased risk of death with Febuxostat (Uloric)”