Diuretics and Gout: Is there a connection?

High Blood Pressure, Prescription Diuretics, and Gout

What is high blood pressure?

High Blood Pressure, also called hypertension, is when blood puts too much pressure against the walls of your arteries. About 1 in 3 adults have high blood pressure, usually with no symptoms. But it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack, and kidney disease.

What lifestyle changes can help lower high blood pressure?

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Native Hawaiians have higher risk for gout, UH study finds

May 31, 2022, 12:30 PM HST Maui News

An analysis of nearly two decades of data of 92,000 people revealed Native Hawaiians had more than twice the risk of Whites participants of developing gout as older adults.

The new study by University of Mānoa researchers — and one of the largest multiethnic gout studies to date — was published in The Journal of Rheumatology.

Gout, a common and painful form of arthritis, is becoming more prevalent in the United States. But the differences in risk between populations remains largely understudied, especially for Native Hawaiians. This study helped shed some light on these differences. It also revealed black participants had the second highest risk, followed by Japanese participants.

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Gout and Metabolic Disease: Can Probiotics help?

As we know, many studies have linked Gout with chronic inflammation and obesity.  Both conditions contribute a group of factors that increase the risks of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes – also known as metabolic syndrome.  Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of biochemical and physiological abnormalities affecting an estimated 50 million Americans.

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Is it OK to walk with gout?

Medical News Today: It is safe for people to walk with gout. In fact, doing joint friendly activities such as walking can help improve gout-related pain.

Gout is a form of arthritis that usually affects the big toe joint, but it can also affect the lesser toes, ankles, and knees. It normally affects one joint at a time.

People with gout may find it difficult to carry out physical activity, or they may be worried that physical activity will make their gout worse.

This article will examine whether or not it is safe to walk with gout. It will also cover how to manage, treat, and prevent this condition.

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Gobble, Gobble- Important tips regarding Gout and Holiday Meals


It was Thanksgiving of 2014 and our family had just concluded another successful gathering full of feasting and festivities. I recall feeling a bit stressed about all the food I had just consumed; food I knew I could, and likely would, pay for later. When you have Gout that dreaded scenario is likely always weighing on you in the back of your mind. WHAT did I just do to myself?

Is there any chance I could dodge a bullet this time?

What can I possibly do to get ahead of this game?

Maybe if just consume a ton of water, and water only, can I avoid the inevitable?

Was that turkey and gravy, and pie, and, and, and….all worth it?

As Gout sufferers we are all fully aware of the risks involved and sometimes we choose to face those risks head on, despite the potential outcome. I remember wondering then if there were measures to take ahead of time to avoid the worry of a splurge here and there. I was young and dumb, and rather clueless about the sheer number of things I did and consumed on a daily basis that kept adding to my demise. Understanding the necessity of balance was never my strong suit.

…..Fast forward to the middle of the night, post thankful feasting, and I am awakened by a pain in my ankle that I knew all too well; the kind of pain worthy of wishing to lose a limb rather than continue the suffering. Said ankle was red hot, swollen and throbbing in pain. Agony was an understatement and black Friday took on a whole new meaning. There would be no shopping, no leftover turkey stuffing sandwiches, nothing resembling anything remotely close to my ability to leave that bed.

I.WAS.MISERABLE. WHY had I done this to myself, again?? I knew better. I began swallowing Colchicine like candy. Que the digestive disaster in the making. Now, I’m sick as a dog AND in pure agony. Ice, heat, water, Ibuprofen, repeat.

Sound familiar?

That attack was one of the absolute worst to date. It continued to move around to different areas of my body and was categorically relentless. I vowed from that day forward that I was going to avoid ever suffering like that again. A wise man told me that I needed to start looking at this Gout puzzle with more clarity and understanding. He told me that we tend to be very narrow-minded in our approach and limited in thinking that one meal could cause an attack when food purines are such a miniscule piece of this puzzle. What was I doing each and every day to contribute to my “glass of uric acid” until that one meal causes it to spill over into an attack? What could I do to lower that full glass to a point where a splurge wouldn’t push me over that edge?

Some important things I’ve learned:

You may have ‘trigger foods’ that spark an attack. A purine-rich meal may push your ‘already full’ glass over the edge and into an attack. However, be sure to understand things were already brewing and these triggers simply tipped the scale.

SOLUBLE uric acid can be measured in your blood supply. However, the uric acid that has crystallized and is now residing in connective tissue cannot be measured with a blood analysis. These crystals are always there, in a solid form, “melting” when the levels in the blood will allow and adding to the buildup when levels in the blood become too high for the blood to carry. These deposits are what migrate into the joint causing the acute gout attack. When the tissue is full, any food indulgences and lifestyle choices that cause you to produce more uric acid than the blood can hold, will allow for deposits that crystallize between the bone joints. This can make you falsely blame one food for triggering your attack when in all actuality it simply “tipped the already full cup over.”

Cellular regeneration is the only way to achieve Gout control success. Food, water, spices, vitamins, herbs, and therapeutic actions (meditation, exercise, listening to music) can significantly elevate the body’s regenerative process. Together they, and you, can take control of your health and begin repair. While some parts will remain permanently damaged, there are many areas where an overhaul can bring you the quality of life you have been missing.




Why Does Gout Attack at Night?



Why Do Low-Purine Diets Fail?



Important tips regarding Gout and other Inflammatory Conditions

Gout Diet: Are Impossible Burgers/Foods Impossible To Be Good For You?

::uric acid picture

We seem to have found ourselves at yet another set of crossroads regarding conflicting ideas when it comes to lab-grown foods such as the Impossible Burger. It may be easy to assume ‘plant-based’ diets are healthy, but are they? We know that highly processed foods are unhealthy and unfortunately this new fad of plant-based foods are exactly that, highly processed.

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Cell Death, Cellular Toxicity, and Gout

Considering that all disease occurs at the molecular and cellular level, could all disease share common causes and common solutions?

Toxic damage to cells leads to cellular death, and in large numbers can result in tissue and organ damage/failure. Some tissues and organs hold the capacity for self-repair, while others have no ability to regenerate. For example, the liver can repair damaged sections by fibrous replacement, whereas the nervous system tissue has no ability to regenerate itself. Of course, even the liver will have trouble if the damage is severe and/or continues to suffer from abuse.

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Is Uric Acid Good or Bad?

Purines perform multiple important functions within our cells, including regulating energy metabolism and signaling the energy conversion from one to another.  Purines are essentially the building blocks for all living things as a necessity for the growth, proliferation and survival of all cells.  The two purine bases, adenine and guanine, create bonds that form the DNA ladder. Humans breakdown purines and convert them into uric acid.

Uric acid happens to be a potent DNA protector.  All other mammals possess an enzyme known as uricase.  Uricase converts uric acid into allantoin, which can easily travel through the bloodstream and readily eliminated through the urine.  Humans do not possess this enzyme, therefore, we cannot oxidize uric acid into the more soluble compound of allantoin.  Our liver and kidneys are left to do the all-important jobs of purine breakdown and uric acid disposal, conducted respectively.

Blood serum uric acid levels are determined by two components:

  • uric acid synthesis
  • uric acid excretion

Synthesis takes place in the liver as a result of the breakdown of purines.  Purine levels are mostly determined by what is naturally produced by the body, with approximately the other 30% absorbed from the food we eat.  The second component, uric acid excretion, is determined by the rate at which the kidneys are able dispose of the excess.  According to a study conducted by Hyon K. Choi in 2005, about 90% of hyperuricemia is attributed to impaired renal excretion.

As we mentioned above, uric acid is a potent antioxidant and DNA protector.  Could this be why only 10% of the uric acid that enters a normal human kidney is disposed of?  Would it be safe to assume the other 90% that is reclaimed and sent back into the bloodstream is done so for our bodies to utilize its powerful antioxidant and free radical neutralizing powers? 

According to science…..

Uric acid is responsible for the neutralization of over 50% of the free radicals in our bloodstream.  Considering humans and primates are unable to naturally produce Vitamin C, we may have inherited the ability to utilize uric acid.  Uric acid remains extremely controversial and difficult to manage.  On one hand, uric acid protects high-oxygen tissues (like the brain) from damage and has been shown to increase the risks of several neurological disorders in the presence of sub-par levels.  On the other hand, high-serum uric acid levels are inversely associated with the severity of several diseases, especially the state of cardiovascular diseases.

Is there a balance?

Yes, although the course(s) of action to achieve this balance may be equally as complex, as well as individually determined.  As a former Gout sufferer, I naturally ventured down the path of reducing my purine intake by focusing on my diet.  Once I understood a bit more about the roles of purines and uric acid I was able to conclude that this path was not going lead me to success. 

I asked myself the following questions:

  1. If only 30% of the purines in my body come directly from food, then will a low-purine diet do anything to help with the main 70% of my production?
  2. Do I have any control over the other 70% that occurs naturally in my body?
  3. Am I doing anything to directly contribute to higher purine production aside from the food I eat?
  4. If the food I eat is low-purine, but still unhealthy, does that have any impact on the amount my body is naturally producing?

The last question truly gave me pause.  If the natural purine production stems from normal DNA and RNA turnover, were there things I was doing to my body to cause my cells to die and turnover faster than usual? 

This brought me to another series of questions, ones I believe to be more relevant to my cause:

  1. Do my medications and over-the-counter drugs contributing to faster cell death?
  2. Was I hydrated enough?  Cellular dehydration is extremely common and definitely causes cellular turnover.
  3. Did my slightly overweight body and lack of exercise have anything to do with the health of my cells?
  4. Was my rather heavy alcohol consumption a bigger problem than just the purines alone?  Does it affect my cells, too? 
  5. Did my high stress life contribute to faster cellular death?
  6. Does my sweet tooth and sugar intake affect my cells and uric acid production?
  7. If my body can’t naturally produce certain vitamins and antioxidants, could I help my body by supplying enough in my diet and supplementation in hopes of my kidneys not reclaiming as much uric acid to help in their absence?

Looking ahead….

These are some really important questions that opened my eyes to a whole new approach and a whole new outlook on the importance of taking better care of myself.  These questions initially targeted my efforts to gauge my cellular health (or lack thereof), but also really put my kidney and liver health into question. Many of us unknowingly damage the health of our cells, furthering excess uric acid production. In doing so, we are also placing unnecessary strain on the very organs we need to help us rid of the excess uric acid.  What a conundrum!

These epiphanies led me to better health, elimination of my medications (blood pressure, cholesterol, and Gout), correction of my glucose levels, secured my beliefs in the right all natural remedies, led to my blog, and changed my life! It doesn’t have to be so overwhelming. Take a step back and look at the bigger picture and you will find there is a lot of common sense in play here, and even more common sense solutions.  Take it slow, one adjustment at a time for attainable goals.  This site offers a series of articles to highlight a bit more on the specifics regarding stress, hydration, diet, and much more

Here’s to your Gout and Inflammation free 2020 and beyond!

Oh no! Santa has the Gout…..

How to survive the Christmas and Holiday Season if you suffer with Gout

A beacon has been sent out from the North Pole summonsing a doctor to come and see what could possibly be wrong with Santa. He can barely move his foot without pure agony. The weight of his bed cover alone is sending him through the roof in pain. Mrs. Claus is distraught. Mr. Claus is running a fever, he has the chills, and his big toe is as red and shiny as Rudolph’s nose.

The doc arrives:

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Is the Keto diet safe for Gout Sufferers?

Contrary to popular belief, the Keto diet is not protein focused. Rather, this diet focuses on a high fat and low carb diet to shock the body into ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic process where the body is able to focus on burning fat with carbs mostly out of the picture. The body doesn’t have to work hard trying to burn the carbohydrates for energy, therefore, blood sugar is lowered and fat burning becomes the main focus.

Is this good for the Gout sufferer? Continue reading “Is the Keto diet safe for Gout Sufferers?”

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